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Slavery in the early american republic

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#1 Slavery in the early american republic

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Slavery in the early american republic

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want Slavery in the early american republic Read saving…. Want to Slavery in the early american republic Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try SSlavery. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic 3. Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of Mason Slavery in the early american republic that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of Slavery in the early american republic Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were ni in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which republjc went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examines the partisan and geopolitical uses of slavery, the conflicts between free states and their thhe neighbors, and the political impact of African Americans across the country. Offering a full picture of the politics of slavery in the crucial years of the early republic, Mason demonstrates that partisans and patriots, slave and free--and not just abolitionists and advocates of slavery--should be considered important players in the politics of slavery in the United States. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in...

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University of North Carolina Press, Matthew Mason seeks to correct the misperception that slavery rarely, if ever, influenced politics during the first two decades of the nineteenth century. He argues that, on the contrary, the issue was everywhere, as either a genuine topic of discussion or a rhetorical device used to shape public opinion or discredit political opponents during national debates that often had little to do with the institution itself. In this way, he challenges the prevailing view that "slavery dropped from the national radar screen" during this era "only to reappear suddenly in The author is most persuasive when discussing the partisan debates that erupted during the War of In these years, he claims, Federalists effectively employed the politics of slavery to indict southern Republicans and generate broad opposition to Madison's administration and the war effort. Significantly, Mason finds northern politicians exploiting New England anger over the three-fifths clause, warning Americans of the emergence of a slave power that could destroy the republic. It is here, then, that Mason finds much of the language and partisan practices that would emerge fully developed during the slavery debates of the s. While he successfully corrects a scholarly tendency to see the Missouri Controversy as a beginning, an opening salvo in a long and increasingly sectional battle over slavery, Mason's uncritical use of the terms abolition and antislavery threaten to undermine his argument. He states, for example, that "if any one thing characterized abolitionism in its early years,. Most specialists would see these statements as problematic; for, as historians of the era would contend, individuals, North Carolinians and Virginians in particular, voiced opposition to the Atlantic slave trade not because they supported abolition but because they hoped to reap the financial benefits of an emerging domestic slave trade...

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Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it. To learn more about Amazon Sponsored Products, click here. Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic is based on extensive research, broad in scope, clearly organized, and well written. Mason has made a significant contribution to the history of the Early Republic and of American slavery. Mason has done an excellent job of assembling and presenting a wealth of evidence in a clear, coherent fashion. It deserves a wide readership and our ongoing scholarly reflection. A major contribution to our understanding of the significant role the institution of slavery had in the politics of the early republic. Mason, in a tightly reasoned and well-written exploration of the period, provides ample evidence that the issue of slavery had ever been a topic about which Americans argued. Davis Mason unapologetically restores politics to the center stage. This is a bird's-eye view that leaves plenty of scope for future researchers. Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. In a revisionist vein, it shows how the years were not really the lull before the antebellum storm. Mason's analysis is based not only on exhaustive primary research but also on a wide-ranging synthesis of secondary works, making the book valuable to both the scholar and the student of slavery politics. Newman, Rochester Institute of Technology Mason's particular contribution is to argue, persuasively, that during the decade or so preceding the Missouri crisis, politicians and clergymen from every region developed and refined their views of slavery and public policy--laying the foundation for the incandescent conflicts of and and foreshadowing the full-blown sectional polemics...

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Reviewed by Stephen E. The University of North Carolina Press, Now that slavery has been restored to its rightful place in the historical literature as the fundamental cause of the American Civil War and as the key question in the war itself, historians have sought to determine when and how the slavery issue rose to such prominence in the years between the Revolution and the outbreak of sectional warfare. Matthew Mason, in Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic , joins this effort to measure the growing significance of the slavery issue in the early nineteenth century. He forcefully argues that historians have mistakenly maintained, in what he calls the "out of nowhere interpretation," that the Missouri controversy had few roots in the political battles of the period between the abolition of the African slave trade in and the divisions surrounding Missouri's petition for statehood 3. Mason carefully reviews the years before the Missouri crisis, demonstrating the growing importance of the slavery issue during a time that historians usually describe as dominated by national concerns and east—west conflicts. Slavery, Mason claims, never went "unchallenged" in this period, and northern opposition regularly brought predictable reactions from the South 5. He maintains that the abolition of the African slave trade in marked a turning point after which the slavery issue took on an increasingly central role in the political debate, particularly during the War of , which Mason calls a "milestone" in the "politics of slavery" New England's Federalist opponents of the war frequently blamed the South's enhanced power in the House of Representatives for the conflict. In particular, they argued that the increased representation given to white southerners by the three-fifths clause enabled passage of the Embargo Act and other measures that New Englanders viewed as inimical to...

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Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examines the partisan and geopolitical uses of slavery, the conflicts between free states and their slaveholding neighbors, and the political impact of African Americans across the country. Offering a full picture of the politics of slavery in the crucial years of the early republic, Mason demonstrates that partisans and patriots, slave and free--and not just abolitionists and advocates of slavery--should be considered important players in the politics of slavery in the United States. Try logging in through your institution for access. Log in to your personal account or through your institution. The years of struggle against Great Britain took what had been weak and disparate strands of opposition to slavery and bound them into a powerful antislavery ideology and movement. The new concern with human bondage also transformed slavery into a potent weapon with a variety of political uses, both international and domestic. Americans, both slaveholders and nonslaveholders, felt compelled to respond to these developments. The contrast between the responses of the Northern and the Southern states opened up a sectional division over slavery for the It entered partisan politics well before the war, of course, and the wartime uses of slavery had an impact on the postwar scene. Between and , American slavery surfaced in several debates between...

Slavery in the early american republic

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Matthew Mason seeks to correct the misperception that slavery rarely, if ever, influenced politics during the first two decades of the nineteenth century. He argues. Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic. By Matthew Mason. (Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press, Pp. Cloth, $). Matthew Mason. Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, xii + pp. $ (cloth), ISBN.

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